No Guarantor Loans in Australia – What You Need to Know

financial situation

When applying for a loan, it is important to make sure that you are aware of the current state of your finances. Not only can your credit score greatly impact your chances of being approved, but it can also limit the amount that you are able to borrow. In this article, we will be providing you with insight into how you can apply for no guarantor loans with ease. 

What Is A No-Guarantor Loan?

A no guarantor loan is a loan that you can apply for without the need for security or a guarantor for your loan to be accepted. A non-guarantor loan is a loan type that allows you as a borrower access to the funds in a financial emergency without the need for an additional person to co-sign on the loan, even if you have a poorer credit score.

Is A Loan Without A Guarantor Expensive?

No, a loan without a guarantor is not more expensive as the APR and interest rates completely depend on the state of your credit score as well as your monthly income at the time of the application. Though a guarantor loan does offer that additional layer of security to the lender, it is important to note that any loans such as this should only be used in a financial emergency. Regardless of whether this is a Payday Loan or a no credit check loan , there are several ways that you can use this loan type when struggling in a financial emergency.

What Can A Non-Guarantor Loan Be Used For? 

Though applying for a loan type such as this should be saved for financial emergencies only, many are still unsure what the loan can be used for. Though it may seem tempting to use a loan such as this for a holiday or for a new television to replace the old model current sat in your living room, it is important to make sure that you are using non-guarantor loans to cover emergencies such as emergency car breakdowns or home and boiler repairs that you may not have the money left in your budget to cover.

How to Apply for This Loan Type

Should you find that the loan type is the right one for you it then comes time to apply. With several lenders allowing for a quick application process through their online platform, applying for a loan type such as this could not be any easier. With a simple form to fill out at the time of application providing them with information that they need on their monthly income as well as the current state of your credit score. From there, the lender will check your credit score and eligibility to determine if you can afford repayments, with the money being paid into your account if you have been successful in your application.

Though this application process may take time, it is important to make sure that you are considering the current state of your finances before applying as this will aid in ensuring a successful application.

Recommended Reading: 3 Steps To Clean Up Your Credit Report

Don’t Make These Top 5 Money Mistakes

money mistakes

We all make mistakes with our finances from time to time – we’re only human after all! While we may have the odd slip from time to time, there are a few major money mistakes that you need to avoid to prevent yourself from falling too deep. By slightly changing your money habits, you can avoid these mistakes and save yourself some serious cash.

1. Making Too Many Minimum Repayments

When it comes to hefty debts, it can feel impossible to shift. It may be tempting to pay off just the minimum amount each month, but this head-in-the-sand strategy will mean that you are left paying interest for much longer, resulting in a higher overall bill. While it is acceptable to pay the minimum when necessary, you should try to pay more than the minimum on the majority of occasions to save you more money in the long run.

2. Not Checking Your Bank Statements

Checking your statements has become a lot easier in recent years, thanks to the introduction of online banking and banking apps, which means there is no excuse for not keeping track. Despite how easy it is to check your statements, many people just look at the big number to see how much cash they have left. It’s a good idea to look through and see where your money is going and spot any mistakes.

3. Not Checking Your Credit File

Not only is it easy to check your bank statements, but you can also check your credit file for free through Experian, Equifax, or TransUnion. It’s essential to keep an eye on your rating and spot any areas for improvements or mistakes, as they could affect your credit applications in the future. While it’s best to have a good credit score that is well maintained, there are credit options available for poor credit, such as no credit check loans or guarantor loans.

4. Not Having an Emergency Fund

Life can be unpredictable when you least expect it, so even if you feel like you are living within your means, this could be dashed at any time. It’s worth putting money aside when possible to help cover any unexpected costs, like a broken boiler or emergency car repairs. In theory, you should aim to have a few months of living expenses in an accessible account, but anything you can put aside may help. Without an emergency fund, you may need to borrow money, but it’s always best to use your own cash where possible.

5. Not Switching Providers

From banking to utilities, there is something to be said for switching providers. In days gone by, there may have been some benefit in being a long-term customer, but these days, new customers tend to get the best deals and options. You should use price comparison sites to work out whether it would be beneficial for you to switch bill or banking providers to get more affordable prices. You can even call your current providers and explain why you are thinking about leaving, as many may miraculously drop the prices for you.

For more support and information on money mistakes, please visit the Money Advice Service.

3 Times You Think You’re Saving Money That Actually Cost You

Saving Money That Actually Cost You

Creating a healthy saving system is an essential step towards achieving true financial stability. However, life is riddled with examples of times when you think you’re saving money, but you’re actually setting yourself up for a financial loss. 

Below is a collection of such examples. Take note of the following points and keep them in mind the next time you’re debating a purchase or investment: 

1. Impulsively Shopping at Sales

Shopping for essential items when they’re on sale is an excellent way to save up! However, the trouble begins when people start buying nonessential items solely for the sake of availing a discount, which gives them the illusion that they’re saving money just because they’ve spent a lesser amount than the original price. Tip: You may use a shopping app to list down essential goods to buy.

Sales cost money, too! So, just because an item was purchased on sale doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve saved a significant amount of money. You still had to let go of some amount, albeit a smaller one, to purchase the product. This results in them unnecessarily spending money they could have otherwise saved.

2. Compromising on Product Quality to Save Money

Although cheaper alternatives to certain products will help you save money in the short term, there’s a high chance they’ll end up weighing your wallet down in the long run. 

This is because cheaper products are typically of lower quality than their pricier counterparts, resulting in them breaking down or malfunctioning sooner than you’d have expected them to. 

Investing in a cheap product usually means you’ll need to replace it much sooner than its pricier alternative. In the end, you end up spending more money trying to either repair or replace the damaged, low-quality product than you would have needed to spend had you bought the higher-quality product in the first place (despite the latter’s heavy price tag). 

So, be smart and buy the expensive, high-quality option. Yes, it will cost you more at the start. Try looking at it as a smart investment that’ll help you save money in the long run.

3. Compromising on Medical Visits

Doctor’s visits sure do cost a lot of money, but the good part is that they help you avoid spending even more money in the future on curing diseases that were caused due to negligence on your part. 

In other words, although skipping your doctor’s visits may seem like a smart, money-saving idea right now, this decision could end up taking a toll on your health, leaving you with massive medical bills to pay in the future for conditions that could have easily been avoided had you not skipped your doctor’s visits in the past (for the sake of saving a few extra bucks in the short-run)

The key to achieving a healthy, balanced approach to saving is to spend money on investments that will benefit you in the long run instead of trying to save a few extra dollars in the short run. Build an emergency fund in case you need to have medical visits.

Saving money doesn’t mean you cut off all your expenses (even the sensible ones!) Instead, it suggests that you cut down on inessential purchases and redirect that amount towards your savings jar. 

4 Steps to Avoid When Trying to Get Out of Debt

Get Out of Debt

Making the decision to get out of a debt is the first step in your journey to financial freedom and security. However, paying off all of your debt isn’t something that happens overnight. It takes careful planning, smart decisions, and commitment.

Here are steps you’ll want to avoid so that you can be successful regaining control over your financial health.

1. Not Changing Your Spending Habits

Humans are creatures of habit, and you’re no exception. We tend to repeat our actions. Why? Because it’s comfortable and what we have become accustomed to.

However, if your goal is to pay off financial obligation, you can’t continue with the same spending habits. This means you’ll have to work extra hard to stop doing things you’ve been doing for months, if not years.

Some of the best ways to improve your spending include:

  • Cooking meals at home
  • Not making impulse buys
  • Separating wants from needs

You don’t have to stop spending on things you enjoy. However, it’s important to make better choices with the money you do spend.

2. Not Creating a Budget

One of the most important tools you’ll need in order to pay off financial obligation is a budget. Without a budget, it’s impossible to gain control of your finances.

Most people don’t create a budget because it “takes too much time.” But the reality is that creating a budget doesn’t require hours upon hours. Getting started is simple.

Start by writing down all of your income. Then write down all of your bills, such as your car payment, mortgage, and utility bills. With the money you have left over, save as much as possible, while also saving some funds for a rainy day.

In the age of swiping cards and mobile payments, it’s all too easy to lose track of how much you’re spending.

3. Trying to Pay Off Too Much Debt at Once

Many people make the mistake of trying to put an end on your debt by paying everything off at once. If you have multiple credit cards and loans, you may put all of your money towards them each month, leaving nothing left to account for emergencies.

Instead of trying to tackle all of your financial obligation at once, prioritize your debt. Start by:

  1. Listing all of your debt
  2. Ordering debt from highest to lowest interest rate
  3. Paying off any small balances (i.e. $200)

Start by paying off the highest interest debt first. Once this debt is paid off, go to the next card or loan with the next highest rate.

You may also want to consider debt consolidation. If you have several credit cards and loans, you can combine them into one loan that is paid at a single interest rate.

4. Not Getting Help

Tackling debt on your own can become extremely overwhelming. Even if you’ve created a budget and prioritized your debt, seeing such large numbers can send you into a mental tailspin.

Don’t hesitate to ask for help and support from those around you. There are also non-profit credit counseling agencies, financial courses, debt counseling, and credit counselors available to help you every step of the way.

Stop Letting Debt Weigh You Down

Carrying around years’ worth of debt gets quite heavy. The good news is that debt isn’t a life-long sentence. With a plan, commitment, and willingness to change, you can finally dig yourself out of your financial hole. Dont make unnecessary money mistakes.

Make financial freedom your future by not making these four common mistakes when getting out of debt.

3 Types of Debts You Should Focus on First

Types of Debts

You’re having a laugh with a friend when they mention that they’ve paid off their mortgage loans or that they’re finally done with college student debts. Your mood instantly turns dark as you realize your situation is the exact opposite. Knowing these types of debts can help you organize your plan how to pay them faster.

You go home, whip out your calculator, and there’s a dizzying list of numbers and figures and percentages and dollar signs. Your debts are crippling, and so are you. So how do you begin paying off these debts? Well, there are a couple of ways to arrange your debt payments in order and achieve your financial goals. Here you go:

1. Secured vs. Unsecured Debts

As you know, while signing a debt contract, there are two types of debts. The ones that have collateral against their monetary value, otherwise known as secured debts. The others are unsecured debts, against which there are no collaterals. The collateral maybe your car, your business, your stocks, or even your residential property.

So while arranging a debt repayment plan, you have to choose between secured and unsecured debts first. In secured debts, something precious to you is actually at stake. You might lose your possession if you do not pay the debt in time, so it makes sense to just clear the secured debts with whatever you can arrange. 

On the other hand, your unsecured debts can become pretty troublesome if you delay them for too long. The pressure will just mount higher, and late payment may also affect your credit score. 

Both are risky, and both are urgent. You just have to keep a balance between the two sets and figure out a repayment method with the least losses incurred.

2. Debts with the Highest Interest Rates

This category is also pretty crucial in figuring out which debts you have to pay back first. The debts with the highest interest rates, such as those on a credit card or a mortgage loan. Other debts, such as student loans or other personal loans, have lower interest rates, which do not accumulate as fast as the higher interest ones.

In this way, it’s usually beneficial to pay back loans in their elevating interest rate. The higher the rates, the sooner you should try to get rid of the debt. This way, you’ll be able to reduce the more significant debts quickly and will be able to focus better on the smaller ones.

3. Small Debts

Many people follow the total opposite of the highest interest rate. They use the debt snowball method by starting paying off their debts with the smallest ones right up to the largest one. This way, you can get rid of the number of debts on your credit sheet and focus much better on the larger ones. In this type of debt arrangement, you don’t have small debtors nagging you for repayments every single day, which is a great benefit in itself.

Conclusion

Debts are terrifying. They keep us up at night. However, paying debts back is not impossible. You just need the right strategy to arrange how you will pay back the different debts you have under your name. From debt, you may then start thinking about how to build your emergency fund.

5 Easy Steps to Build Your Emergency Fund

Emergency Fund

The unexpected can happen at any time, which could leave you without an income, a job, or at another type of disadvantage in life. When this happens, having access to some sort of emergency fund can be a significant advantage. An emergency fund gives you access to finances in dire times. In turn, you gain an opportunity to get back on track, while being sure that financials are covered by this fund.

Following a telephonic interview, one report shows that a mere 23% of adults in the US have an emergency fund. This means the remaining 77% are left at a disadvantage should they be struck by misfortune. If you are looking for some solid advice to get your own emergency fund going, then simply follow the five simple steps we share.

1. Understand Your Goals

One of the most important factors when it comes to saving plans and funds is to understand the financial goals you have. Before you build an emergency fund, set clear goals that are easy to follow – then break them down into smaller ones. Perhaps you want to aim for an emergency fund that can care for your entire family for a period of six months. Consider how much would be needed. You should also determine how long it will take you to achieve the goal.

2. Open the Right Account

The type of account you use for your emergency fund is important. Certain account types come with several fees that need to be paid on a monthly basis. This can reduce the amount of money you end up saving in the fund. Talk to your bank manager and make sure you use an account that is suitable for an emergency fund.

3. Create an Automated Deposit Plan

In an interview, 32% of people who are aged between 18 and 29 reported feeling more secure about their job security. Even though secure, unexpected events do happen. Once your account is up, be sure to configure an automated monthly deposit. This way, you’ll never forget to add more funds.

4. Cut Expenses or Increase Income

To build up your emergency fund faster, consider getting a side hustle that brings in some extra cash. Alternatively, see if there is any way to cut on some of the expenses you currently have.

5. Add Manual Payments

If you are able to create a second income or cut down on expenses, then you give yourself an opportunity to get to your goals faster. As you obtain extra income, be sure to make a few manual payments into the savings fund. This ensures you build-up toward the goal amount faster and that you will be sufficiently covered in those unexpected events.

Conclusion

When struck by a misfortunate event, such as a job loss, or a serious disease, having an emergency fund can save the day. Unfortunately, many Americans do not have any type of emergency fund at their disposal. To get started with yours, be sure to follow the five steps we shared in this post.

How to Choose Your Student Loan

Student Loan

Choosing the right student loan can seem like a daunting task. In order to get the right amount of money, and the best interest rates, you need to do a bit of shopping around instead of just choosing the first one you see. Student loans come in all shapes and sizes. Let’s take a look at some of the key things to consider when choosing student loans.

1. Interest rates

The first thing to note about interest rates on student loans is that they can either be fixed or variable. If they’re fixed, the interest rate won’t change over time. But if they’re variable, they can. This is important as you could end up paying different amounts of interest each year.

If you choose a subsidized federal student loan, with a fixed interest rate, the federal government pays the interest while you’re still in school. If it’s a Direct PLUS loan, you will pay interest while you’re in school. The rate is fixed until you pay it off too, between 2.95% and 9.15%. For private loans, variable interest rates can range from 1.02% to 12.37%.

2. Fees you might have to pay

Along with interest rates, there may be other fees associated with your chosen student loan. These are usually quoted as a percentage of the total loan amount. The fee usually comes off the amount of money you receive per payment, so you pay the fees automatically.

For federal loans, fees can range from 1.057% to 4.228%, depending on whether it’s subsidized or not. Loan arrangements may also have late payment fees to think about when it’s time to start paying it back. So, it’s vital that you always repay your student loans on time!

3. Maximum loan amount

The third thing to consider when choosing between student loans is the loan amount itself. The maximum amount of money you can borrow depends on a number of factors. These include your credit score, your degree type and which year of school you’re in.

With a federal loan, most undergraduates can borrow between $5,500 and $12,500 per year. Postgraduates are generally able to borrow up to $20,500 per year. Loan amounts for private options vary just as much. There are options for as little as $1,000 up to the full cost of your tuition, so they often offer more flexibility at the cost of higher interest rates.

4. Repaying your student loans

While the above factors will contribute to how you repay your student loan, it’s also important to consider the repayment terms. Most loans, both federal and private, will offer a 6-month grace period for undergraduate loans.

While private loans tend to be less flexible in terms of repayments, federal loans offer a bit more wiggle room for those facing financial hardship. If you’re in the world of teaching, military service or other public services, there may be debt forgiveness options available to you. So, it’s always worth checking if you’re eligible to have some of your student loan debt forgiven and make sure you clean up your credit report.